This evening thousands of Americans turned on their television to watch the 2014 Grammy Awards. Although I wasn’t one of them, I did peruse the tweets, and Facebook posts that followed the event. While scrolling through my Facebook homepage, I saw a link to the Beyoncé performance. Since I enjoy her music, I decided to take a quick peek. Although I thought she performed well, the performance did leave me with an upset stomach. Now don’t get me wrong, she is a good singer; what made me upset was the fact that she and millions of other women are having to “strut their stuff” in order to become popular.

After watching the video, I laid in my bed thinking to myself about this unfortunate scenario. As a woman, I understand all of the pressure we are put under when presenting ourselves in public. However, I am not a girl who would dare wear something I find promiscuous or inappropriate, and I don’t find it flattering when other women do. Although Beyoncé chose to wear the outfit, I think it is a shame that women have to dress in a sexual manner in order to make money.

Hundreds of commercials are made each year. Whether their purposes are to sell the latest shampoo, body lotion, hair spray or beer, the commercials we see on television typically have some sort of sexual message to them. Although, like Beyoncé, the women in these commercials choose to do this, and I am constantly questioning why in the year 2014, women have to strut their stuff in order to sell a bottle of iced tea! Seriously folks, I do not think people understand how damaging these commercials are to our culture, future generations and even to ourselves.

The fact is, when someone sees a commercial for beer, shampoo or body lotion with a woman acting promiscuously, negative message are sent. When I see these commercials, I realize I would never act that way, but the bodies of the young women in these ads make me question my own body. Although I am considered small, I do question whether I am needing to loose weight, if I’m pretty or if I wear what I should. I am not the only woman that does this, and, in fact, guys do it as well. However, children, especially teenagers are questioning themselves every day because of what they see on television.

Daytime television is watched by children of all ages. Although it is the parents’ responsibility to monitor what their children watch, we are incapable of monitoring what commercials come on during the time youngsters watch television. When young girls see a commercial for shampoo with a middle-aged woman acting in a sexual manner, they automatically assume that’s the way they should act.

This situation needs to end. Not only for the children of today’s culture but for future generations. We need to take a stand and allow companies to realize that they can sell their products in “cleaner” ways. Although this epidemic is continuing now, we can still help youngsters understand that they can be successful without flaunting what they’ve got. Educating youth about becoming involved in their community in a positive manner will enable them to understand that they can be successful in a non-sexual manner. This will also instill them with the confidence they need to feel good about themselves.

Allie Smeeth

Hello! My name is Allie Smeeth, I am currently a junior at Concordia. I am majoring in Multimedia Journalism and minoring in Communications. Throughout my time at Concordia I've been involved in Habitat For Humanity, the Concordian and am currently involved in the up and coming Family Weekend Committee. Other than doing school work, I enjoy reading, watching tv, and hanging out with my lovely fellow cobbers. I grew up in Germany and have lived in South Carolina, Nebraska and Minnesota for the past three years. After college I plan on going to grad school for communications and plan on working at a non-profit in the cities after I've completed graduate school.

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