After a majority of Concordia students finish their midterm tests and projects and prepare to leave campus for a four-day recess, what they might not be realizing is that student-athletes will be hanging around campus.

Though student-athletes might not get a break from games or practice, the break from school work can come as relief.

“The best part [of the academic recess] is only having to focus on one thing and actually getting to catch up on school work,” Katie Lippert, a senior on the volleyball team said. “The student-athlete balance can get to be a lot so it’s nice to have nothing due for school and just enjoy playing the game.”

Women’s basketball head coach Jessica Rahman says that from a coaching standpoint, academic recesses can provide a good time to get some rest from athletics as well.

“We really strive for a good balance,” she said in regard to athletics and rest over a recess. “I strive to give my athletes at least three days off.”

First-year student from Brookings, S.D., and goalkeeper for the women’s soccer team, Maddy Reed is looking forward to the recess but has some reservations about remaining on campus. One concern is getting enough food, since Anderson Commons closes over academic recesses.

Reed said the women’s soccer team has some team meals planned.

“Sometimes the upperclassmen are good at taking care of us,” Reed said.

Adam Kessler, a junior on the men’s soccer team from Arden Hills, Minn. says that the team takes time to bond over home-cooked meals around the Fargo-Moorhead area hosted by either player’s families or alumni. The time after the meal is reserved for relaxing.

“We stay for an hour or two after [eating] and just hang out,” Kessler said.

When not eating home-cooked meals, the men’s soccer team eats out because the school pays for one or two meals.

“We get a money limit on how much we can spend on those meals,” Kessler said. “We’re definitely well fed.”

Kessler says that video games are a popular form of relaxation among the men soccer players. According to Lippert, the volleyball team plans to carve pumpkins and watch Disney movies.

Over the recess, the men’s and women’s soccer teams will play a game Oct. 24 and the men will play again Oct. 25. The volleyball team will play Oct. 23 and Oct. 24.

“The plan [over the recess] is to kick ass and get plenty of sleep,” Lippert said.

Competing over an academic recess can bring a different dynamic to the game, according to Rahman.

“I try to avoid scheduling games when there’s not a large student population,” Rahman said.

Rahman said that the crowd at a game over a recess normally does not create the same type of environment that a normal game would create.

“We need to create the excitement ourselves.” she said.

Reed says that being an athlete is really rewarding and even though she will have a chance to spend a brief amount of time at home over the recess, not having a chance to spend ample time with family is hard.

“It can be difficult when you don’t get a chance to go home.” she said.

Kessler remembers being a first-year student with the same feeling.

“I was a little disappointed that I couldn’t go home my freshman year,” he said. “I wanted a few days to relax.”

However, sometimes student-athletes have an opportunity to spend time with family without going home.

“My parents never miss a game, so that helps things feel less lonely,” Lippert said. “I will get to spend the evenings hanging out with my family.”

The feelings of loneliness for Lippert have slowly faded as the connection between her teammates has grown.

“Now I don’t even really think about going home because Concordia has become that for me,” she said. “I just enjoy having a break so we can relax.”

Men’s and women’s soccer, volleyball and football will compete over the recess while the winter sports will be practicing for their upcoming seasons.

Justin Marquette

Senior from Moorhead, Minnesota. Sports writer for The Concordian.

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